blood orange curd

Apparently, lots of people hate the word ‘curd’, but since people also hate the word ‘moist’ I’ve decided to stop listening when people hate the way words sound. Languages are strange, yes, though I will agree its strange because it comes from/means coagulated milk and unless we’re talking about butter there is no milk in this kind of curd. Cheese curds obviously, but those are also delicious. Curds of all kinds are welcome here.

I have a deep and longtime love of lemon curd. I’ve made it many times over the years, given it as gifts, eaten it with most imaginable pairings (and with a spoon), and my favourite pie is made with it. But after falling in love with blood oranges this year, I wondered why I had never really had much less made any variation on the traditional lemon. So after many a google and search through my favourite recipe blog, I found enough varieties to get comfortable with the kinds of changes involved in switching out the citrus.

If you’ve ever made curd before, you know its much easier than it sounds. And varying the fruit involved is just as easy – I think it comes down to adjusting the sugar ratios to make sure you have the right flavour at the end. After all, not many fruits are quite as sour as lemons. So after a few batches, here a not too sweet quick and easy blood orange curd! This makes essentially a personal sized amount, as in you could eat this before it goes off on your own, about 1 1/2 cups I think.

blood orange (or any citrus) curd

5 egg yolks (I always save the egg whites and only use them about half the time)

3/4c sugar

zest and juice of 4-5 blood oranges

7tbs cold butter, cubed

  • zest and juice oranges
  • in a small saucepan simmer juice until reduced by about half
  • Over a double boiler (heat proof bowl sitting over not touching a pot of boiling water) whisk together eggs, sugar, zest, and concentrated juice
  • add butter cutes one at a time, whisking until combined before adding the next
  • whisk constantly for approximately 10 minutes until thickened
  • strain if desired to remove zest and any possibly cooked egg (I never do, but it may remove some bitterness from the zest)
  • store in air tight jars, refrigerated

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s