Food

peanut butter & chocolate tart

This tart was my Dad’s birthday dessert, because I knew there was no going wrong with chocolate and peanut butter. The filling is inspired by peanut butter buttercream, which I have seen him eat straight from the mixer, but with cream cheese to play up the texture and tang from peanut butter. This isn’t a particularly sweet dessert, but you could easily make it a little more sweet tooth friendly by using milk chocolate for the ganache!

This tart crust is my absolute favourite, it’s just about fool proof and the foil trick (from Smitten Kitchen) is a million times better than dealing with pie weights. You could do it by hand, or with a pastry cutter, but a food processor makes the trickiest part of this dessert much faster!

Tart Crust

1 1/4 c flour

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 c powdered sugar

1/2 c (one stick) cold butter, in pieces

1/2 tsp vanilla

  • preheat oven to 350
  • in the bowl of food processor, combine first three ingredients until mixed
  • add butter and vanilla, blitz until combined and dough comes together
  • set aside marble sized piece of dough (for future repairs)
  • press dough into tart or pie pan, coming all the way up the sides and getting dough as even as possible
  • freeze for 10-15 minutes
  • prick with fork all over and up sides
  • press lightly oiled foil onto dough, no pie weights needed
  • bake for 15 minutes covered, then slowly peel off foil and bake for another 5, crust should be lightly golden
  • chill tart case

Peanut Butter Filling

1/2 c cream cheese

2 tbs butter

1/4 c powdered sugar

3/4 c peanut butter (I microwave the jar to make it easier to measure)

1/2 tsp vanilla

  • beat all ingredients together in the bowl of a stand mixer (or really really hard by hand) until fluffier
  • chill until ready to fill crust
  • scrape into cooked and chilled crust, smooth into an even layer, place in freezer for 10 minutes

Chocolate Ganache

1 c semi sweet chocolate chips

1/2 c heavy cream

  • in a small saucepan or microwave safe bowl, slowly melt until incorporated
  • let cool slightly
  • pour over cold tart
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Food

dark chocolate and rosemary scones

Soft, more crumbly than chewy, and incredibly flexible, dessert scones are underrated. These are like shortbread meets a biscuit, with flavours just complex enough to make them fit in at breakfast or dessert.

The recipe is inspired by this one from Molly Yeh, but using this scone recipe from El’s grandmother as a base instead. While you could definitely make these in a food processor, I find rubbing the butter into the flour to be a calming activity so I make mine by hand.

dark chocolate and rosemary scones

2 c flour (if using self raising flour, omit baking powder)

1 1/2 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

3-4 tbs sugar, depending on how sweet you want your scones and how sweet your chocolate is

1/2-3/4 c cold butter, cubed (start with 1/2, but you may need a little more – it’s all based on texture!)

3-4 tbs rosemary cream (below)

1 tbs vanilla

3/4 c dark chocolate chips

  • combine flour, baking powder, sugar and salt in large bowl
  • rub cold butter into dry ingredients until smooth and crumbly, it should just hold it’s shape when you squeeze it together
  • add in vanilla and rosemary cream, dough should come together and pull away from the sides of the bowl
  • fold in dark chocolate chips
  • dust dough in flour and chill, wrapped in plastic, for about 30 minutes until butter is cold again
  • roll out to desired thickness, about 3/4 inch thick, and cut into circles with a cookie cutter or glass
  • place on baking tray lined with parchment and bake at 400 for about 15 minutes, or until lightly golden
  • top with glaze (below) while still warm

rosemary cream

3/4 c heavy cream (or milk, any dairy will work but heavy/double cream adds a nice richness)

4 sprigs of rosemary (fresh is best but dried will work, you’ll just have to strain it well

pinch of salt

  • combine in a small pan and bring ingredients to a simmer over medium heat
  • remove from heat and let steep for 15 minutes
  • divide among scones and glaze

rosemary glaze

remaining rosemary cream

1/2 powdered sugar

  • in a small bowl, slowly add powdered sugar to cream, whisking continually. Add sugar until desired thickness is reached
  • top scones while warm
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